PIco de Gallo / Salsa Fresca

11 07 2011

 Quite simply Pico de Gallo is the freshest, cleanest, most delicious condiment you could wish for to accompany Mexican food or indeed anything that could do with something light and zingy alongside.

   Ingredients:

2x  Tomatoes

2x White onions

1x Red Chilli – I use Habanero or Scotch bonnet but its completely up to you and the level of heat would desire

a good handful of fresh coriander leaves

the juice of 1 lime

sea salt to season

Method:

Chop the onion and chilli into fine dice and place into a bowl.

De-seed the tomatoes and dice the flesh.

Finely chop the coriander and combine together with the onions, chilli and tomatoes. ensure that everything is well worked together and squeeze over the juice of 1 lime.

Season to taste with a little sea salt.

 

 

 

 

 

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Pleasure and Pain – Divine Torture Hot Sauce

1 07 2011

It has been a while since  I have last been excited about a new hot sauce being released…the very fact that I find hot sauce releases to be exciting suggests that I may possibly have a diseased mind but moving swiftly on.

Divine Torture is the first super hot sauce from Pleasure and Pain and is being produced in small batches of just 50 bottles a time…how is that for exclusivity!

The manufacturers blurb sounds quite interesting –

” Developing our own super hot sauce has been no easy task and quite frankly the tasting sessions alone have almost killed us, but the result is something we are all very proud of. Foxy has devoted the last 12 months to creating, quite literally, lava in a bottle. Using Scotch Bonnet and Naga chillies and two different varieties of chilli extract to intensify both the immediate and secondary burn this is something not to be trifled with. “

At less than a tenner a bottle my order has already been placed…expect to see a review coming as soon as the postman can deliver.





Naga Viper – The World’s Hottest Chilli Pepper?

15 12 2010

There has been a lot of buzz for a while now that the fearsome Bhut Jolokia has been knocked off its top spot as the world’s hottest chilli pepper.

It was announced back in October that Gerald Fowler from the Chilli Pepper Company had grown a new chilli that had not just beaten the Bhut but had destroyed it…. not only that but it has been developed and grown in the UK of all unlikely places.

The name of this deadly little beauty, the Naga Viper and here it is:

Rather unassuming for something that would melt your face and having you rushing for the chilled toilet paper.

The Viper is the result of selective cross breeding of the Bhut Jolokia, Naga Morich and the Trinidad Scorpion all of which are so hot it is not even funny.

Warwick University HRI have carried out HPLC testing on the Viper and have returned some pretty impressive numbers, it seems this bad boy has a LOT of heat 1,349,000 SHU to be precise.

Now numbers by themselves don’t always mean a lot to people so here is a quick comparison:

Bhut Jolokia – 1,001,304

Red Savina Habanero – 350,000 – 577,000

Jalapeno – 2500-8000

So we are looking at a chilli that is over 250 times the heat of a jalapeno, now that is hot!

There is an awful lot of dispute going on as to the veracity of the results, in particular there are claims that NMSU  are the only real authority in terms of accurately measuring the heat of a chilli, whether NMSU are the be all or not one thing is certain further verification will be required before Guinness start handing out world record certificates.

As of the end of October Gerald Fowler was in the process of sending pods away for DNA testing so before too much longer it will be official one way or the other.

Personally I think that whether or not the Viper is crowned top dog it is only a matter of time before someone in the UK turns out a world-beating variety and it says a lot about the skill and dedication  of chilli growers in the UK that they are turning out chilli peppers that are even in contention considering the huge climatic disadvantages we suffer from in this part of the world.

Picture credit – cascade news




Big Tom’s Secret Hot Sauce

10 04 2010

I realized yesterday that something terrible had happened…I had run out of hot sauce. This might sounds like a rather minor inconvenience to most people but unfortunately for me I am a chili addict.

I simply can’t get enough of that sweet, intoxicating chili heat and the store-bought sauces just don’t cut the mustard anymore, they tend to be too sweet, with an unnatural taste and certainly they are lacking that much-needed kick of heat.

There are some amazingly good hot sauces out there such as NagaSoreAss by CA Johns or a recent discovery Louisiana Gold Wasabi Hot Sauce but these aren’t the sort of hot sauces you would want to use everyday.

So of course I make my own.

My hot sauce of choice is loosely based on a Trinidadian hot sauce that I tried a few years back but I have played around with it until it has a little more heat but still keeps a great flavour.

So here it is for the first time ever

Big Tom’s Secret Hot Sauce:

15 Habanero or Scotch bonnet chilis

15 Chipotle chilis

15 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped

15 spring onions, cut into 1-inch pieces

1 large carrot, coarsely chopped

1 cup pure fresh orange juice

3/4 cup distilled white vinegar

1/2 cup yellow mustard hot English mustard – I use Colemans but any strong mustard would work

1/2 tick of celery, roughly chopped

2 large handfuls of chopped coriander leaves

2 tablespoons thyme

2 tablespoons fresh lime juice

2 bay leaves

tablespoon of crushed black pepper

Salt
Cut the stems off of the chilis and discard, you will however want to keep all of the seeds in the chili as if not you will lose a lot of the heat

In a blender or food processor, pulse the chilis with the garlic, spring onions, celery and carrot until finely chopped.

Now add the black pepper, vinegar, orange juice, mustard, coriander, thyme, crushed bay leaves and  lime juice and pulse just until combined.

Season with salt.

Once the sauce has been made you will need to transfer it into jars or bottles in order for it to keep. The vinegar acts as a preservative for the sauce and I have kept this in the fridge for up to a year without sterilising the jars.








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