King’s Arms – Bury St Edmunds

7 05 2012

When I was working in Bury St Edmunds the King’s Arms was our favourite spot to head to for lunch and a few pints on a Friday.

It is a reasonably quiet pub owing to it’s location just off of the main shopping area in town and as such has a nice relaxing vibe that is perfect for winding down after work or chilling out of a weekend.

The pub itself is of a reasonable size and is pretty much what you would expect for a traditional pub in a bustling market town; there is one main bar area with a good amount of seating, a smaller dining area off to one side and a lovely little beer garden which magically seems to always be in full sun….

Food was always good with the usual pub grub that one would expect done to a high standard and served with commendable speed, always a plus when you are on a “working lunch”!

The selection of beers is, or was as the case may now be, excellent. Usual suspects from Greene King, Ruddles and Morland accompanied by a nice choice of two or three guest beers on tap.

All things considered the King’s Arms is well worth a visit if you are passing through this charming little market town.

The King’s Arms, 23 Brentgovel Street, Bury St Edmunds Suffolk
http://gkpubs.co.uk/pubs-in-brentgovel/kingsarms-pub/
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Joel Campbell rejects Arsenal

20 07 2011

Joel Campbell scanning the horizon for cash

Depending on how much of an alcoholic you are (says the man who reviews beer!) you may or may not remember the weekend.

If you are somehow able to recall what happened a few days /pints ago you might remember the assured tone taken by many “respected” sources as regards the “signing” of Costa Rican international striker Joel Campbell.

We were told that a fee had been agreed and that there was even an agreement in principle between Arsenal and the player, his own father/agent/twat, Humberto Campbell, told us that they were thrilled and everything would be signed, sealed and delivered within the next 24 hours.

Magically the next morning everything had changed, quelle fucking surprise, now we were hearing how other offers had arrived from a host of European clubs and that whilst Arsenal were in “pole position” nothing was in the bag just yet.

Fast forward a few days and we are now told by Campbell senior that his son will be staying with current club Deporivo Saprissa for the foreseeable future in order to focus on the Under 20 World Cup in Colombia.

Apparently there are offers on the table that need to be analyzed and that they will negotiate after the world cup, in his own words “We hope to go to the World Cup and that Joel plays well without pressure. We’ll see what happens.”

Now whilst this is an admirable line for his father/agent to take it does rather fly in the face of his prior dealings and comments….

In fact reading between the lines one might be inclined to believe that what he is really hoping for is that his little darling has an impressive World Cup and that all of a sudden clubs cheque books fly open like a whores legs.

Juan Carlos Rojas the president of his son’s current club had this to say on the matter:

“It’s disappointing for football, for Saprissa that these people have not taken Arsenal’s offer seriously,” explained Rojas.

“I assume the father thinks things will get better after the decision, but there’s always a risk.”

Hmmm… seems I’m not the only person who hears the pitter patter of greedy feet. Personally I hope the whole venture backfires terribly for him, if there is one thing Arsenal doesn’t need it is more money grabbing cunts/agents and their sneaky tricks.





Shepherd Neame Amber Ale

18 01 2011

Amber Ale is a 4.0%  seasonal ale from the  Shepherd Neame brewery in Faversham, Kent.

The Beer was launched in early 2009 as a winter warmer and has been available in January and February in 2010 and again in 2011.

Amber Ale is available as a cask ale however the two pints I had most recently were bought bottled as part of the Lidl Beer Festival which just seems to be an excuse to shift a whole bunch of Shepherd Neame beers as the other choices were Bishop’s Finger, Spitfire, 4-4-2 and Autumn Blaze – not that I am going to complain at €1.49 a bottle!

As the name would suggest Amber Ale pours to a very clear coppery/amber colour with a very thin white head that vanishes away rather quickly. Within a minute or two of the beer being poured there is very little if any visible sign of carbonation suggesting that it might be quite soft in that regard.

The main aromas from the beer are citrus, some fruitiness and hops, LOTS of hops, I found this a little odd as a I would expect a beer billed as being a winter warmer to have a bit more richness to it, maybe a bit more sweetness and perhaps even a touch of spice…

The taste of the beer followed on pretty closely from what I could smell; there was quite a bit of citrus and some fruit – possibly apples married with a big hit of fragrant hops.

There is supposed to be a blend of pale, crystal and brown malts added which I would have thought would add a certain depth and richness to the beer but I have to say I only picked up the slightest hint of malt whatsoever.

The body is rather on the light side and matches the ABV which is a little on the low side for this particular style of beer which more often comes in over the 5% mark.

I didn’t find that this beer put me much in mind of a winter warmer, it just seemed a little too light and lacking in flavour and could have used quite a bit more malt to balance out the hopping. That said I did actually quite like it, I could easily imagine myself enjoying several pints in a sunny beer garden.

3.8/5





Bateman’s XXXB

3 01 2011

Batemans is an independent brewery from Wainfleet in Lincolnshire; the Bateman family have been operating the brewery on a pretty much continual basis since  1874 and along the way have turned out some cracking beers and picked up rather a lot of awards – the most recent of these being “Best Regional Brewer” at the Publican Awards 2010.

XXXB is their 4.8% premium bitter and has previously been voted as being one of the top 50 beers in the world.

I have sampled XXXB on a number of occasions over the past few years, both on tap and most recently bottled as part of a deal from our local off licence – all Batemans beers €2.00 a bottle, a real bargain by Irish standards!

XXXB pours to a nice clear coppery finish with a mid-sized head that lasted reasonably well with a fair amount of lacing.

The initial aroma that I picked up was that of a slightly bitter  black tea with some citrus and a bit of sweetness coming in afterwards  – possibly toffee.

On drinking this beer the first thing I noticed was that there is very little sweetness to it, the citrus comes through quite clearly along with a slight nuttiness and some biscuity richness from the malts.

There is a lot of bitterness present through out along with the slight taste of black tea, this with the slight element of citrus makes for a very refreshing pint although some might find it a touch sour towards the finish.

The body is reasonably light but the carbonation is spot on resulting in a very pleasant mouthfeel overall.

In my opinion XXXB is better than average but there is certainly room for improvement.

4/5





Greene King Harvest Ale

24 11 2010

Harvest ale was one of several seasonal ales released by Greene King.

I say was as unfortunately Harvest Ale is now “retired” and is increasingly difficult to find.

The aroma is rather pleasant with predominately malty tones and a hint of dried fruit creeping in.

In terms of appearance Harvest pours to a very dark brown – imagine coca cola almost with a thin beige head which lasts reasonably well.

Harvest is quite sweet but it isn’t sickly there is a nice dark malty taste with elements of raisins and a nice hint of red berries which carries through to the finish adding a slight element of sharpness which helps to cut through the sweetness.

Considering that Harvest is a mere 3% ABV it is surprising that there is as much body as there is, it is nicely rounded  with a fairly soft carbonation.

All in all I always found Harvest Ale to be a really good example of a brown ale and thought it was a damn shame when GK decided to retire it, especially when you compare it to some of their recent offerings!

4.2/5





Fuller’s London Pride – English Pale Ale

22 11 2010

fullers london prideLondon Pride is Fuller’s flagship beer and has to go down as being one of the best examples of an English pale ale.

It is widely available on cask in the south of England and is one of the most commonly encountered bottled real ales that you can find, you can even find it on British Airways and American Airlines flights!

The cask version of London pride comes in at 4.1% ABV whilst the bottled version is slightly more alcoholic at 4.7% .  Personally I prefer my London Pride from the cask but there is really very little difference between the two.

The aroma that you get from London Pride is primarily malty with a suggestion of fresh bread, there is a slight note of hoppiness that comes through in the background along with a hint of toffee which adds a pleasant sweetness.

When poured there is a rather thin off white head, about 2 fingers worth, that lasts well and provides a fair amount of lacing. The body of the beer is a  clear amber colour that just sparkles when the light hits it.

 Following on from the dominant aromas of the beer the first flavour that you notice is a rich biscuit taste coming from the malt along with the toffee sweetness some buttery caramel and a light fruitiness.

The hopping in London Pride is great, there is a good level of bitterness that perfectly balances with the rich malts and helps to cut through the sweetness the leafy hop flavour is refreshing and carries through to the finish.

London Pride has a nice well rounded feel to it with a medium body, good carbonation and a wonderful smoothness to it, the flavours are complex and layered with everything working together perfectly.

A truly outstanding beer

4.9/5





Old Speckled Hen – 5.2% bottled/4.5% cask

15 11 2010

So often these days product names come about as the result of million pound research campaigns by marketing executives with perma-tans and expensive hair cuts, this thankfully isn’t the case when it comes to real ale.

Quite often there are quaint little tales of why this brewery is called this or why this beer has such a name Old Speckled Hen has one of these little tales all of its own.

The beer itself is named after an old MG which was used as a runaround for workers in the MG factory. Over years of service, the car became so covered in flecks of paint it earnt the nickname “Owld Speckled ‘Un”,  which Morland changed to “Old Speckled hen” when they brewed a special commemorative beer for the factory’s 50th anniversary in 1979 The name being thought up by one Ian Williams who worked in personnel in the factory at that time.

These days Morland is just one part of the huge brewing machine that is Greene King but thankfully the name has stayed the same and so has the beer.

Old Speckled Hen used to be 5.2% across both cask and bottled versions but in recent years Greene King have reduced the ABV of the cask version to 4.5% in order to promote it as more of a session beer; this certainly seems to have paid dividends for them as the availability of Old Speckled Hen on draft has increased quite significantly since then. Personally I still prefer the kick of the bottled variant though.

So onto the beer itself;

There is a fairly good level of aroma to Old Speckled Hen, it has a predominant smell of medicine or cough syrup with a  nice hint of malty richness coming in as a background note.

The beer pours to a nice bright and clear amber colour that looks very inviting and rich with an off-white head that stay well throughout drinking.

There is a lovely sweet malty taste to Old Speckled Hen along with a slightly burnt caramel taste not dissimilar to cinder toffee. Underlying these sweet malty flavours are delicious spicy hints along with a lemony citrus note that helps to balance out the richness and sweetness.

The mouthfeel of Old Speckled Hen is most enjoyable, there is a real body and richness that balances perfectly with the dry finish.

Whether bottled or cask Old Speckled Hen makes a great session beer  but is also rich and robust enough to hold its own alongside food.

4.5/5








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