World’s largest burger revisited….

11 07 2011

As we all know records are there to be broken, no matter how nasty, pointless or completely wasteful the attempt might be.

Well a few months back I wrote about the World’s Largest Burger which weighed in at around 95kg…well  this has been beaten…twice.

In May this year Canadian “Food Entertainer”  Ted Reader created this monstrosity…

 

Which as you can see weighed in at an Earth shattering 590 pounds (267.6 kilograms) … that is nearly 3 times the weight of the prior champion.

 

Well the USA were not about to be outdone by their northern neighbours, particularly not in a race to have a giant food item.

So without further ado I give you the new reigning champion….

This “appetising” giant tops the charts at a heart stopping 777lbs, that doesn’t just beat the competition it annihilates it.

The burger in question was cooked at the Alameda County fair and  included a 110lb bun, 20lbs of onions, 12lbs of pickles and 30lbs of lettuce…OH and1,375,000 calories – enough to feed one person for almost two years.

Apparently proceeds from the sale of the burger went to a local food bank… one wonders whether they couldn’t have just given the actual food.

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PIco de Gallo / Salsa Fresca

11 07 2011

 Quite simply Pico de Gallo is the freshest, cleanest, most delicious condiment you could wish for to accompany Mexican food or indeed anything that could do with something light and zingy alongside.

   Ingredients:

2x  Tomatoes

2x White onions

1x Red Chilli – I use Habanero or Scotch bonnet but its completely up to you and the level of heat would desire

a good handful of fresh coriander leaves

the juice of 1 lime

sea salt to season

Method:

Chop the onion and chilli into fine dice and place into a bowl.

De-seed the tomatoes and dice the flesh.

Finely chop the coriander and combine together with the onions, chilli and tomatoes. ensure that everything is well worked together and squeeze over the juice of 1 lime.

Season to taste with a little sea salt.

 

 

 

 

 





Brussel sprouts with leeks and bacon

28 12 2010

When it comes to enjoying brussel sprouts I am normally in the minority,

There is something about sprouts that just seems to put people off; now personally I think a lot of it comes down to two things – how fresh they are and how they are prepared.

There is a huge difference in taste between wonderfully fresh sprouts still on the stalk and those little wizened ones you buy in those nets or even worse frozen.

When really fresh sprouts have a wonderful sweet nuttiness to them that I would defy most people to find unpleasant.

Of course it doesn’t matter how fresh the sprouts are if you are just going to boil the life out of them and serve up a big dish full of soggy, mushy balls with all the taste and goodness boiled out of them.

I like to go off on a bit of a tangent with my brussel sprouts, especially if I am going to be serving them to people that claim not to like them I prepared this dish of sprouts with leeks and bacon to go along with Christmas dinner this year and it was  a huge success, even with non sprout eaters – you know who you are 😉

*If you want to make a vegetarian version of this dish you can leave out the bacon and crumble in a little bit of stilton about a minute  before serving*

Ingredients:

250g fresh Brussel Sprouts

150g Leeks

4/5 rashers of bacon

1/2 of a small onion

garlic salt

black pepper

olive oil

unsalted butter

Method:

Remove the outer leaves from the sprouts and make a small cross shaped incision on the base, this will allow for faster more even cooking

Clean the leeks and split down the centre before chopping into thin slices,peel and finely dice half an onion

Cook the sprouts in boiling water for about 3 1/2 – 4 minutes before refreshing by plunging into cold water. Now cook the leeks for just long enough for them to start to soften before draining and setting to one side.

Chop the bacon into small pieces and place to one side, now take the sprouts and slice them into quarters, if any of the sprouts are particularly large you may want to chop them into more pieces.

Fry the bacon in a little olive oil until it has just started to crisp at this point add in the chopped sprouts and a good knob of butter.

Cook the bacon and sprouts for around 3 minutes stirring regularly, add in the leeks, black pepper and garlic salt, stir through well and continue to heat for another 2 minutes or so until the leeks have warmed through.

Serve immediately.

 

 





Burger King Pizza Burger WHY???

15 12 2010

So I was happily trawling through the net earlier on today when I came across this…

The Burger King Burger Pizza

This 2,500 calorie behemoth has been available at the BK’s “Whopper Bar” in Times Square, New York City since September.

According to BK officials the Pizza Burger is the answer to the age old dilemma of whether to grab a pizza or a burger in order to sate your hunger.

Now I realise I’m not representative of the populace at large but…. a.) I have never asked that question & b.) That monstrosity would never be the answer!

For those who aren’t puking in disgust at the thought of this let me give you a quick run down of what makes a pizza burger…

 9 1/2 inch bun

4 x flame broiled whopper patties

Pepperoni slices

Marinara sauce

Mozzarella cheese

Tuscan pesto sauce

 Burger King have said that they have no plans to roll this out to any other restaurants across their chain and that it is an homage to NYC, now I’ve been to New York on several occasions and never was I put in mind of a gigantic burger topped in mushy crap.

With the pizza burger following on the heels of the equally repulsive Enormous Omelet Burger and the Triple whopper I wonder if at this point Burger King’s entire R&D budget isn’t being blown on trying to create the grossest most fattening sandwiches known to man?

 

 

 





Best roast potatoes in the world

9 11 2010

Being British I have eaten my fair share of roast potatoes, quite often as an accompaniment to roast beef but just as often alongside other less traditional dishes or just by themselves.

Some roast potatoes are good, some are ok and some are a downright insult. These roast potatoes are great.

Personally I love the mix of the regular potatoes with their new world sweet potato counterparts but you can exclude these if you want to keep things old school, if you don’t use the sweet potatoes then replace them with more white potatoes.

You will need:

2lb of white potatoes

1lb of sweet potatoes

2 large red onions

3 cloves of garlic

extra virgin olive oil

balsamic vinegar

fresh thyme

fresh rosemary

a handful of  sage leaves

sea salt

black pepper

 

Pre-heat an oven to 200 degrees C

Peel your regular potatoes and cut them into pieces of uniform size,  boil these for approx 6-7 minutes until they are part cooked.

At this point place the potatoes into a colander and give them a shake so that the edges get chuffed up. Pat dry the potatoes using some kitchen paper so they are as dry as you can get them.

place your potatoes into a large roasting tray and pour over a good amount of the extra virgin olive oil about 3/4 table spoons. Roll the potatoes around so that they are all evenly coated in the olive oil, season the potatoes with a good pinch of salt and pepper.

At this point pop the tray into the oven and cook for about 30 minutes, at this point they should be lightly golden brown .

Whilst the potatoes are in the oven by themselves you can prepare everything else; peel the onions and chop them into at least quarters, peel the garlic cloves and roughly smash them so that all of the flavour is released, clean your sweet potatoes and chop them into small chunks with the skin left on, remove any woody stalks from your rosemary and thyme.

Take a bowl and mix the herbs together with a good glug of olive oil and about 2  tablespoons of balsamic vinegar.

Take your tray of potatoes and add in the sweet potatoes, onions and garlic making sure that everything is well distributed.

Now pour over the mix of herbs, oil and vinegar again making sure that everything is well coated and well distributed.

Turn the oven down to approx 180 degrees C and cook for a further 45/50 minutes until everything is crispy and bubbling.

Transfer to a dish and either serve immediately or cover with a lid and serve within 15/20 minutes at the most.





Best Steak and Mushroom Pie

7 11 2010

It has come to my attention recently that pies are now trendy… don’t really know what to say about that as where I come from they have never really gone out of fashion but that is by the by.

The weather is drawing in and it is the time of year for something warming and that is exactly what this steak and mushroom pie is.

To make a pie that will feed 4-6 people you will need the following:

500g diced steak (round steak works well)

500g mushrooms (any old mushrooms will do)

2 large white onions

2 carrots

2 tomatoes

a good handful of parsley

1 clove of garlic

1 pint stout or porter

1/2 pint beef stock

500g shortcrust pastry

salt and pepper

1 tbsp worcestershire sauce

1 tbsp tabasco sauce

flour

make sure that the steak is diced into smallish cubes, if any seem too large then cut them until they seem about right, pop the cubes of steak into a bowl of seasoned flour and ensure that all of the chunks are well coated.

Heat some butter or lard in a large pan until it is just about smoking, now add the cubes of steak in batches until all of the meat is browned off.

Place the steak to one side until later, now add the diced carrots and onions to the same pan and cook until they are starting to soften.

Once the carrots and onions have softened add the diced tomatoes, chopped mushrooms and the chopped parsely to the pan along with the remainder of the flour from the bowl and all of the wet ingredients, stir together well and return the steak to the pan.

Cover the pan and leave to cook over a low heat for at least 1 1/2 hours.

Ensuring that your pastry is nice and chilled roll out enough to make the base of your pie and line your pie dish/an enamel plate with it. You will want to leave soem over hang so that you can make a good seal with the lid later on.

Place your pie dish/enamel plate into the fridge to keep the pastry cool and to prevent shrinking until you need it.

Once the filling has been cooking for 1 1/2 hours take it off of the heat and leave to one side for it to cool as you do not want to be putting the filling onto the pastry whilst it is still hot.

Brush the inside of the pie crust with beaten egg to stop it from going too soggy, now add your cooled pie filling into the pastry and make sure it is well spread and evenly filled, there is nothing worse then a big gap in your pie.

Brush some beaten egg around the top lip of the pie crust so as to form a seal and place the lid of your pie on top.

Make sure that you cut a hole for the steam to escape from during cooking, now brush the remainder of the beaten egg over the top of the pastry to give it a lovely golden colour.

Cook the pie for approximately 30 minutes in an oven that has been preheated to around 180 degrees. Once the pastry is golden brown on top the pie is ready.





A quick (but delicious) update

28 06 2010

A couple of months back I posted my recipe for pickling onions (or anything else you want to pickle) a few readers commented saying they were going to try them etc etc so this update is for these people more than anyone else!

God Damn they are good!!

I don’t often write things down I just kind of stash them in my head for later, as such anytime I do write down a recipe I tend to actually make it so as to be sure that I have committed it to paper correctly, as such 8 big jars of pickled shallots (no silver skins to be found) were squirreled away in order to facilitate my posting of the recipe.

I decided a little while ago to be cheeky and to try one even though to my mind it’s a little early.

Well I’m glad I did!

They were sweet, but sharp, lovely and crunchy and because I’m a chilihead deliciously devilishly hot.

Needless to say I soon found excuses to finish the whole jar, the rest are going to be treated as an experiment; I will open one jar a month for the next 7 months and see just how wonderful they end up 😀








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