£95 burger takes the biscuit

25 07 2011

I was trawling the internet during a particularly dull moment in my work day and happened to come across an article highlighting the 4 most expensive burgers in the world (whatever did we do for fun before the internet?)

The holder of this auspicious title is the £95 “Charity Burger” from Burger King.

The meat used in the burger was Australian farmed Wagyu beef mixed with 20% Aberdeen Angus fat due to it’s own very low fat percentage – usually around a mere 2%.

This most exclusive of  patties was complimented with  oven-dried Pata Negra ham, organic mayonnaise, pink Himalayan rock salt,  truffles and 25-year-aged Modena balsamic vinegar. To make up for the fact that therewasn’t a chip in sight the whole thing was stuffed with banana shallots fried in a tempura batter made using Cristal champagne.

The buns used to contain this pinnacle of burger creation were made using white truffle flour and dusted with lashings of rare Iranian saffron.
 Served on proper china and accompanied by a glass of Claret this is a burger that is a far cry from the usual paper wrapped Whopper.

Mark Dowding, the director of product development and innovation for Burger King (“Just call me the Burger King chef”) is very proud of his creation, which he says took six months to “develop”.  All proceeds from the sale of the 100 finished burgers went to an undisclosed charity.

Well even if there had been more than 100 of these available I really don’t think I would ever be able to justify spending the best part of a ton in order to chow down on a burger; especially as I am really not sure it would have been that great.

Wagyu beef is a really specialist product that has a taste and texture all of it’s own, a big part of which is the very leanness that BK have worked so hard to combat….I’m just not convinced that it would work at all as a burger.

Moving on from the burger itself; truffle flour buns with saffron, deep fried, banana shallots, truffles, mayonnaise, parma negra, himalayan rock salt and aged balsamic vinegar. That is a sh*t-load of strong flavours and whilst they may work well together there is a real risk that it would just be completely overwhelming.

My final gripe is based on the “charitable” element of the burger; at £95 each sales of all 100 burgers would generate a mere £9,500. Now far be it from me to criticise ANY charitable donation but for a company the size of Burger King lauding the donation of less than £10k just seems like a bit of a PR stunt.


World’s largest burger revisited….

11 07 2011

As we all know records are there to be broken, no matter how nasty, pointless or completely wasteful the attempt might be.

Well a few months back I wrote about the World’s Largest Burger which weighed in at around 95kg…well  this has been beaten…twice.

In May this year Canadian “Food Entertainer”  Ted Reader created this monstrosity…


Which as you can see weighed in at an Earth shattering 590 pounds (267.6 kilograms) … that is nearly 3 times the weight of the prior champion.


Well the USA were not about to be outdone by their northern neighbours, particularly not in a race to have a giant food item.

So without further ado I give you the new reigning champion….

This “appetising” giant tops the charts at a heart stopping 777lbs, that doesn’t just beat the competition it annihilates it.

The burger in question was cooked at the Alameda County fair and  included a 110lb bun, 20lbs of onions, 12lbs of pickles and 30lbs of lettuce…OH and1,375,000 calories – enough to feed one person for almost two years.

Apparently proceeds from the sale of the burger went to a local food bank… one wonders whether they couldn’t have just given the actual food.

Stilton and bacon Empanadas

17 06 2011

I had some left over shortcrust pastry from baking a quiche the other day and decided to make something that I haven’t made for a very long time…Empanadas.

Cheese and bacon may not be the most adventurous or indeed traditional of fillings but it tastes delicious and who doesn’t love cheese and bacon?

In this particular recipe I am using a really sharp nutty stilton  which works brilliantly but you can just as well use any good hard cheese. I have often made these empanadas with a smoked cheddar and can safely say that they are to die for!


Shortcrust Pastry – Click here to see how to make your own

75g good quality stilton

75g smoked bacon

1 egg

salt and pepper to season


Chop the bacon into small pieces and lightly fry, place into a bowl and crumble in the stilton.

Combine together the cheese and bacon and season with a little salt and pepper to taste – be careful with the salt and only add if you feel it is really necessary as the stilton is quite salty to begin with.

Roll out the pastry and cut out circles roughly 3 inches across.

Place your filling into the centre of the pastry circles and join the edges together with a little beaten egg to seal.

Brush the outside of the empanadas with the beaten egg to give a nice glaze and place into an oven preheated to 220 C for about 10/15 minutes or until the pastry is lightly golden and puffy.









BBQ pork ribs

12 04 2011

This is a really great recipe for quick and easy  pork ribs in a delicious sweet and smokey BBQ sauce that works great with pretty much anything.

It is really easy to tweak the sauce to suit your own personal tastes, a little more sugar or some honey if you want it sweeter, a little more chilli powder or some dried chili flakes if you want a bit more heat.

If for some bizarre reason you don’t like pork you can just as easily use beef ribs and they will still taste delicious.


2-3lbs back or spare ribs

1 cup ketchup

1 cup water

2 tbsp white wine vinegar

1 tsp salt

1/2 tsp ground pepper

1 tsp mustard powder

1/2 tsp ground cumin

1 1/2 tbsp Worcestershire sauce

1 tsp chilli powder

1 tbsp brown sugar

1 tbsp smokey paprika

1 cup  onion

1 clove garlic



Mix together all of the ingredients for the bbq sauce in a large saucepan, and simmer 20 minutes.

Allow the sauce to cool and baste the ribs liberally before placing into a low oven, cook for approx 4/5 hours or until the meat is really tender and nearly falling off the bone.

Every hour or so re-baste with a little bit of the sauce to keep the ribs nice and juicy.

Serve with the remaining sauce.

World’s Largest Burger

1 02 2011

A few months back I wrote a post listing what I deemed to be the 12 most disgusting foods in the World.

Well of course it is sod’s law that as soon as you commit anything like this to paper, or type as it is in this case, you suddenly come across a whole raft of other goodies that would easily have earnt themselves a place.

This is one of those contenders…

This humongous burger was cooked up by the owners of the Ambrosia on the Spot Cafe in Sydney, Australia.

The patty alone weighs in at an Earth shattering 178lb and took 12 hours to cook through. If  the meat alone wasn’t enough to induce a heart attack in 50 of your nearest and dearest friends the burger also contained 120 eggs, 150 slices of cheese, 1.5 kg of beetroot, 16 tomatoes, 2kg of lettuce and half a kilo of BBQ sauce…oh and 21kg of bread to make the giant buns.

The total weight of the burger once cooked – 95 kg!! That’s the same amount that I weigh, in fact it’s actually 1 kilo more than I weigh and I’m not a small guy.

The Guinness book of records have confirmed that this is indeed the World’s largest burger and that it has soundly smashed the previous holder which weighed in at a positively wimpy 84kg.

The owners of the cafe had to create special equipment to hold the burger during the marathon 12 hours that it took for it to cook through and it took four men in order to flip it over.

The burger was created solely to break the world record and to act as a publicity stunt however in order to meet the requirements laid down by Guinnes this monstrosity has to be on the menu at the cafe for at least a year.

Anyone wishing to tackle this mountain of meat will need to give at least 24 hours notice and will have to stump up a mighty A$1,500 (€1,100) for the pleasure.

Oh and they should probably have their affairs in order

Authentic Chicken Korma

24 01 2011


When most of us think of a chicken korma we imagine the mildest dish on the menu and quite often a dish which is overly rich and creamy but that really doesn’t taste of very much whatsoever.

Well as with a lot of foods served up at takeaways or restaurants throughout the country this perception is a little off the mark; the word korma actually refers to the cooking process as the meat should be braised and whilst the dish is usually creamy and rich due to the yoghurt that is added there is really no basis to it being a mild curry and certainly nothing at all that should mark it out as being bland.

My chicken korma recipe gives a curry that is a little bit of a compromise, I have cut down on the cooking time in order to simplify the dish but whilst it would be recognisable to most takeaway fans in the UK and elsewhere it is anything but bland.


1kg chicken breasts or thighs with the bones removed

a pinch of saffron

6 cardamom pods

2tsp cinnamon

4  cloves

1 tsp turmeric

1/2 tsp chilli powder

1/2 tsp white pepper

1 tbsp coriander powder

1tsp garam masala

1/2 tsp asafoetida

2″ piece of ginger

4 garlic cloves

50g flaked almonds

100g natural yoghurt

2 large onions

300ml chicken stock

salt to taste

50g creamed coconut


Put the  saffron in a bowl and pour over about half a pint of boiling water. Leave to soak for approximately 10 minutes or so.

Dice your chicken into good sized pieces and place into a large mixing bowl, cover the chicken with the natural yoghurt and set aside for about half an hour

Blend the ginger and garlic together in a food processor with a splash of water until it is a purée.

Heat some vegetable oil in a heavy bottomed saucepan over a low heat and add the cardamom, cinnamon and cloves. Let them sizzle for 25 – 30 seconds and add the onions. Increase the heat to medium and fry the onions until they soften, 5-7 mins

Add the ginger and garlic paste and fry for a further 2 minutes.

Add the salt, turmeric, chilli powder, white pepper,chilli powder, asafoetida and ground coriander and fry gently for about a minute.

Add the chicken, creamed coconut and flaked almonds turn up the heat to a medium flame. Stir everything well so that the chicken is well coated in all of the spices etc. Pour in thechicken stock, cover the pan and simmer for around half and hour.

About 5 minutes before you have finished cooking stir in the saffron in warm water from earlier on and the garam masala, leave the lid off the pan for the remainder of the cooking time.

Garnish with some flaked almonds, chopped chillies and some coriander leaf.

Real men DO eat quiche

27 12 2010


 Real men don’t eat quiche….

 I must have heard that line about a thousand times at this point, somehow there is this strange view that quiche is some sort of effeminate food that no proper man would touch for fear of developing breasts on the spot.

Well I happen to think that any man who is worried that his choice of food makes him look “faggy” has some issues that only a few sessions with a psychiatrist will be able to sort out.

Quiche is great!

You only have to take a cursory look at the basic components of a quiche to work out that this is food that is packing some serious flavours yet can still be light and delicate.

Quiche is also incredibly versatile; you can add pretty much anything you like into them and a quiche can be a great quick meal to knock up out of store cupboard staples or leftovers.

The simplest quiche to make is the ever popular quiche lorraine, which incidentally should NOT include onions. However I have decided to go for something a little more fancy and have included my recipe for one of my all time favourites: Chorizo and red pepper quiche.


250g of good quality chorizo sausage

2 red bell peppers

1 clove of garlic

5 eggs

1 medium red onion

250ml double cream

250ml milk

125g gruyerre – you can use manchego if you want an authentic spanish cheese

3/4 tsp paprika

sea salt

black pepper

shortcrust pastry – shop bought pastry is fine but it is even better if you make your own.


Peel and finely dice the onion and garlic and set aside for later

Roll out your pastry to the correct size for the pie dish you are using and line the dish making sure it is well pressed into all of the nooks and crannies. Place the pastry lined dish in the fridge so the pastry can chill.

Stir together the milk and double cream before mixing in the eggs.

Grate the cheese and stir into the cream, milk and egg mixture until it is well incorporated, season with the paprika, salt and pepper.

Soften the diced onion and garlic over a low heat and place to one side to cool

Dice the chorizo and colour in a pan until it is lightly browned

Deseed the red peppers and slice into strips before mixing in with the chorizo, onion and garlic.

Take the pie dish out of the fridge and spoon in the mixture of chorizo, peppers, onion and garlic ensuring that it is well spread out and that all of the base of the pastry is covered.

Pour over the egg, cream and cheese mix and fill to the top of the pastry.

Bake in a 180 c oven for between 45 minutes and 1 hour or until the eggs have set and the top is golden brown.

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