Home Arthritis remedies

5 10 2010

A couple of weeks ago the weather started to change; it suddenly got a lot colder particularly of a night time and in the mornings coupled with this was an increase in how lovely and damp everything was, Autumn had arrived, or as I prefer to call it Arthritis season.

I happen to love Autumn and Winter, they just don’t love me, in particular they don’t love my hands and wrists, even now at the beginning of October I am suffering with a lot of stiffness in my hands, particularly in the mornings.

So it is time for me to break out my selection of homemade remedies to help ease things along a bit.

Here are a couple of things that have worked for me in the past and might well work for you. Please bear in mind that I do not have rheumatoid arthritis and can’t vouch for how efficient or not these remedies are in treating it.

Ginger – A Chinese friend of mine back in the UK always swore by ginger as being the best medicine that he knew of for helping with arthritis as far as I could gather ginger is a strong antioxidant and therefore able to help prevent breakdown of cartilage.

He used to steep a one inch piece of root ginger in boiling water for about 15/20 minutes and drink it as a tea each morning, however if the idea of ginger tea doesn’t appeal then you could just try and incorporate it into your daily diet. If you cant get fresh ginger then 3/4 tsp of dried ginger would be the equivalent of a 1 inch segment.

Wolfs bane/Arnica – I love Wolfsbane as it is useful for so many things not the least of which is helping to remove the aches and pains associated with arthritis.

Wolfsbane is best used as an oil or liniment applied to unbroken skin, you should apply a few drops to the affected area and then massage it into the skin working in the direction away from the heart. Please be aware that Wolfsbane is incredibly toxic and is not to be taken orally under any circumstance.

Click here for a great Wolfsbane and Comfrey liniment that is also very good at reducing swelling and bruising.

Bay Laurel/Laurus Nobilis– Bay Laurel make a great alternative to commercially available anti-inflammatories. Bay has been used for centuries in traditional folk medicine and a lot of people claim to have had great success in treating Osteoarthritis with Bay Laurel.

As with the ginger the best way to get the benefits of bay laurel is in an infusion; take 5 to 8 bay laurel leaves and steep them in 250ml of water for 30 mins. Strain the infusion and drink twicely for a month.

A lot of people notice a reduction in symptoms of Arthritis within a week and there are reports of many people having complete relief inside of a month.

I would avoid taking this bay infusion if you are pregnant as bay has been used in the past to promote abortion.

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Homemade Tigerbalm

23 03 2010

Well following on from yesterday when I posted my recipe for making Dit Da Jow; I dug out an old notebook and decided to look through and see what other little gems I might have lurking away.

Here is another of my all time favourites that again I haven’t made for ages:Tiger Balm

To make your very own Tiger Balm you will need the following:

3.8 ozs Beeswax pearls

2.4 ozs Menthol Crystals

1/2 oz of Petroleum Jelly

2 ozs Camphor Essential Oil

1 oz of each Clove, Cajeput and Cassia Essential Oils, if you can’t get Cassia you can use Cinnamon essential oil instead

Small metal tins or glass jars (about 4 oz.)

1/16th oz chili extract (capsaicin) – This isn’t strictly needed however I have always added it as it helps with joint pain

Melt the beeswax and petroleum jelly in the pan over very low heat.

Weigh out the menthol crystals and add to pan, the smell off of this may well be overwhelming at first so you might want to open a window.

Stir continuously until melted and then add the chili extract if using. Once the extract  is all mixed in, remove from heat and add the essential oils, make sure that they are incorporated well and pour into tins, then all you have to do is leave it to harden.

Once your tigerbalm has had time to harden and cool it can be used straight away, however I have experienced better results when it has been allowed to mature for a while  first.








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