Uley’s Old Ric

22 12 2010

I had this beer at the GBBF back in the summer I remember that my sole reason for picking up this particular pint was that I was at the festival with my uncle who just so happens to be called Ric and after a day of drinking strong ale this seemed like the funniest thing ever.

Old Ric is one of the regular beers from the Uley brewery in the Cotswolds and is named after Ric Sainty who was the landlord of the Old Spot Inn in Dursley.

Ric was much loved by his customers and sadly passed away in 2008.

The beer itself is a clear amber colour with a thin white head and a fruit filled, hoppy aroma.

The aromas of the beer come through strongly in the taste and there is a nice full-bodied fruitiness that is very nicely balanced with a slightly bitter finish and a hint of alcohol dryness.

I found Old Ric to be very easy to drink and would like to get my hands on some more should the opportunity arise.

4.2/5

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Great Oakley Gobble 4.5% bitter

30 09 2010

I’m finally sober and coherent enough to start reviewing some of the many beers sampled at this year’s Great British Beer Festival.

One that I have fond memories of  is Gobble from the Great Oakley Brewery in Northamptonshire.  Admittedly a lot of the fond memories I have stem from Alan, Ric and I thinking it was hilarious to approach the young lady manning this particular pump and asking her how much she was charging for a gobble…. I think we might have had a few by that point.

Off colour wordplay not withstanding I did enjoy my pint of Gobble and it seems like I wasn’t the only one;  Gobble won joint bronze in the “Special Bitter” category.

When poured Gobble was a lovely golden coloured beer with a weak head,  the aroma was light and zesty with a nice hint of caramel creeping in at the back and just seemed to scream summer drinking.

In terms of taste Gobble had a nice soft hoppiness coupled with some zingy citrus fruits making for a very refreshing taste, this was offset with a nice hint of caramel sweetness.

I noticed a little bit of an oily texture to the beer but considering the hoppiness and the nice citrus sharpness this wasn’t unpleasant and rather seemed to prevent the beer being too dry.

All in all a very very good little beer and well deserving of it’s award.

4.75/5





Woodforde’s Admiral’s Reserve

9 08 2010

Before I chuck myself into my write up of this year’s GBBF (Great British Beer Festival) I thought I should really get round to publishing these reviews that have been kicking about on my notepad for a while now; so here is the first of them:

Admiral’s Reserve is a strong ale from the Woodforde’s brewery in Woodbastwick, Norfolk. Despite being a small brewery Woodforde’s have consistently produced exceptionally good beers and Admiral’s Reserve is no different.

When poured it has a tawny almost coppery colour with a very small, almost non-existent, fluffy head.

The aroma from the beer is fruity and sweet with a roasted malt undertone which stops it from being sickly or over powering.

Woodforde’s say that in both flavour and smell there are hints of sultanas, almond and sherry and they are bang on the money; however unlike a lot of beers with these particular flavours Admiral’s Reserve has none of the Christmas cake like overtones that you would expect.

The fruit is sweet but light, there are notes of caramel which add to the overall sweetness of the beer but there is also a rich roasted flavour that comes through from the malts (rye malt I believe) which balances things out nicely.

The mouthfeel of the beer is full bodied, malty and smooth with a nice bitter finish.

All in all a good beer and one that could be drunk often.

3.8/5





A Drop of Nelson’s Blood

5 05 2010

A Drop of Nelson’s Blood is one of a range of bitters from Farmers Ales (Maldon Brewing).

It was brewed for Trafalgar Day (21st October) and takes it name from Nelson’s body being returned to England preserved in a barrel of brandy. It is said that the sailors on the Victory drank some of the brandy as part of their grog ration, which became known as Nelson’s Blood. So a beer inspired by a national hero, a promising start!

Farmers Ales are based in Maldon in Essex and from what I gather they are very much a local brewer with local pubs featuring their beers on tap and a handful of restaurants and shops distributing bottled beer.

I had this particular beer in it’s bottle conditioned form at the restaurant of the Hyde Hall RHS garden a few miles down the road from the brewery.

In appearance it was a nice dark amber colour with no discernible sediment and very little by way of a head, the aroma is quite light and fruity with a slightly malty undertone but wasn’t particularly pungent.

In terms of taste I found Nelson’s Blood to be a little watery for my liking but it had quite a pleasant fruity,hoppy taste with a slight hintof caramel, there was also a fair strong nutty, woody taste that was coming through.

There is a slight hint of warmth to the beer which is possibly from the addition of the brandy.

All in all I found a Drop of Nelson’s Blood to be a not unpleasant beer from a good local brewer, it wouldn’t have me clamoring for more but at the same time I wouldn’t say no to a pint.

Overall I would give a score of 3.9/5





Who are CAMRA?

29 04 2010

You will probably hear me mention CAMRA a great deal in my posts, as such I should probably explain who they are and what they do.

In a nutshell CAMRA is the CAMpaign for Real Ale, they were formed back in the 70s with the aim of promoting and raising awareness for Real Ale, Real Cider and the British Pub.

They tend to promote smaller brewers and champion the less common types of beer and other traditional drinks; for example porters, milds, perry and stouts.

They publish a good beer guide each year, along with their monthly magazine which goes out to about 100k members.

CAMRA also organise and support a large number of beer festivals around the UK including the Great British Beer Festival at which there are often awards given out to beers that they deem to be particularly worthy.

If you want to find out more about them or possibly even become a member than you can visit there website here








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