Top 10 countries with the worst health in the World

4 07 2012

It isn’t really any sort of state secret that I like facts, figures and lists. Gosh do I like lists!

Well I was trawling through the internet earlier on today and found a list the peaked my interest, Top 10 countries with the worst health in the World!

WOW…Top 10 least healthy countries in the World.If that isn’t a conversation starter right there than I don’t know what is!

The nasty cynical side of me (is there any other?) was expecting to find the good old US of A topping the list due to the national diet of Big Macs and Corn Syrup but no, it wasn’t to be.

Turns out you are far more likely to find yourself on the list if your local surroundings look a little like this…

I liked the article so much that I have shamelessly stolen in to share with all of you! If you want to see the original in all it’s glory then feel free to visit at Health Fiend magazine

10. Somalia

Somalia’s public healthcare system was largely destroyed during the ensuing civil war. As with other previously nationalized sectors, informal providers have filled the vacuum and replaced the former government monopoly over healthcare, with access to facilities witnessing a significant increase.

Many new healthcare centers, clinics, hospitals and pharmacies have in the process been established through home-grown Somali initiatives. The cost of medical consultations and treatment in these facilities is low, at $5.72 per visit in health centers (with a population coverage of 95%), and between $1.89–$3.97 per outpatient visit and $7.83–$13.95 per bed day in primary through tertiary hospitals. Comparing the 2005–2010 period with the half-decade just prior to the outbreak of the conflict (1985–1990), life expectancy actually increased from an average of 47 years for men and women to 48.2 years for men and 51.0 years for women.

According to a 2005 World Health Organization estimate, about 97.9% of Somalia’s women and girls have undergone female circumcision, a pre-marital custom mainly endemic to Northeast Africa and parts of the Near East that has its ultimate origins in Ancient Egypt.

9. Angola

Angola lies in the yellow fever endemic zone. Cholera incidence is high. Only a small fraction of the population receives even rudimentary medical attention.

As of 2004, the ratio of physicians per population was estimated at 7.7 per 100,000 people. In 2005, average life expectancy was estimated at only 38.43 years, one of the lowest in the world. That year infant mortality was estimated at 187.49 per 1,000 live births, the highest in the world. The incidence of tuberculosis in 1999 was 271 per 100,000 people. Immunization rates for one-year-old children in 1999 were estimated at 22% for diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus and 46% for measles. Malnutrition affected an estimated 53% of children under five years of age as of 1999. From 1975 to 1992, there were 300,000 civil war-related deaths. The overall death rate was estimated at 24 per 1,000 in 2002. The HIV/AIDS prevalence was 3.90 per 100 adults in 2003. As of 2011, there were approximately 240,000 people living with HIV/AIDS in the country. There were an estimated 21,000 deaths from AIDS in 2003. In 2011, 38% of the population had access to safe drinking water and 44% had adequate sanitation.

8. Cambodia

As of 2010, the life expectancy is 60 years for males and 65 years for females, a major improvement since 1999 when the average life expectancy was 49.8 and 46.8 respectively. The Royal Cambodian Government plans to increase the quality of healthcare in the country by raising awareness of HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases. Cambodia’s infant mortality rate has decreased from 115 per 1000 live births in 1993 to 54 in 2009. In the same period, the under-five mortality rate decreased from 181 to 115 per 1000 live births. In the province with worst health indicators, Ratanakiri, 22.9% of children die before age five.

7. Burundi

Republic of Burundi, is a landlocked country in the Great Lakes region of Eastern Africa bordered by Rwanda to the north, Tanzania to the east and south, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the west. There is less health care in Burundi than in most other countries. Life expectancy at birth is estimated at 48.5 years. (2005) A large proportion of the population is undernourished. There were 3 physicians per 100,000 persons in the early 2000s. The HIV/AIDS prevalence has been about 4.2 % in 2007.

6. Burkina Faso

Average life expectancy at birth in 2004 was estimated at 52 for females and 50 for males. The median age of its inhabitants is 16.7. The estimated population growth rate is 3.109%. Central government spending on health was 3 % in 2001. As of 2009, it was estimated that there were as few as 10 physicians per 100,000 people. In addition there were only 41 nurses, and 13 midwives per 100,000 people. Demographic and Health Surveys has completed three surveys in Burkina Faso since 1993 and is currently in the process of performing another. According to the World Health Organization in 2005 an estimated 72.5% of Burkina Faso’s girls and women have suffered female genital mutilation (term used to describe traditional or religious procedures on a minor).

5. Rwanda

The quality of healthcare is low, with one in five children dying before their fifth birthday, often from malaria. There is a shortage of staff, and some medicines are in short supply or unavailable. 87% have access to healthcare but there are only two doctors and two paramedics per 100,000 people. The government is seeking to improve the situation as part of the Vision 2020 development programme. In 2008, the government spent 9.7% of national expenditure on healthcare, compared with 3.2% in 1996. It also set up training institutes including the Kigali Health Institute (KHI) and started a social service scheme. HIV/AIDS seroprevalence is declining due to government policies; the rate is estimated at 3%.

 

4.Mozambique

Health expenditure per capita was 42 US$ (PPP) in 2004. In the early 21st century there were 3 physicians per 100,000 people in the country. Infant mortality was at 100 per 1,000 births in 2011. HIV prevalence among 15 to 49 year olds exceeds 10%.

3. Afghanistan

According to the Human Development Index, Afghanistan is the second least developed country in the world. Every half hour, an average of one woman dies from pregnancy-related complications, another dies of tuberculosis and 14 children die, largely from preventable causes. Before the start of the wars in 1978, the nation had an improving health system and a semi-modernized health care system in cities like Kabul. Ibn Sina Hospital and Ali Abad Hospital in Kabul were two of the leading health care institutions in Central Asia at the time. Following the Soviet invasion and the civil war that followed, the health care system was limited only to urban areas and was eventually destroyed. The Taliban government made some improvements in the late 1990s, but health care was not available for women during their six year rule. Afghanistan has one of the highest incidences of people with disabilities in the world. There are an estimated one million disabled or handicapped people in the country. An estimated 80,000 citizens of the country have lost limbs, mainly as a result of landmines. The nation’s health care system began to improve dramatically since 2002, which is due to international support on the vaccination of children, training of medical staff. According to USAID, infant mortality rate has dropped by 33 percent and approximately 64 percent of the total population now has access to some form of health care. Most Afghans live within one hour travel to a health facility. 2. Sierra Leone This country has a very high infant mortality and a very low life expectancy (44 years). The maternal death rates are also the highest in the world, at 2,000 deaths per 100,000 live births. The country suffers from epidemic outbreaks of diseases including yellow fever, cholera, lassa fever and meningitis. The prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the population is 1.6 percent, higher than the world average of 1 percent but lower than the average of 6.1 percent in Sub-Saharan Africa. 1. Ethiopia According to the head of the World Bank‘s Global HIV/AIDS Program, Ethiopia has only 1 medical doctor per 100,000 people. However, the World Health Organization in its 2006 World Health Report gives a figure of 1936 physicians (for 2003), which comes to about 2.5 per 100,000. Globalization is said to affect the country, with many educated professionals leaving Ethiopia for a better economic opportunity in the West. Ethiopia’s main health problems are said to be communicable diseases caused by poor sanitation and malnutrition. These problems are exacerbated by the shortage of trained manpower and health facilities. There are 119 hospitals (12 in Addis Ababa alone) and 412 health centers in Ethiopia. Ethiopia has a very low average life expectancy of 42 years. Infant mortality rates are relatively very high, as over 10% of infants die during or shortly after childbirth, (although this is a dramatic decrease from 16% in 1965) while birth-related complications such as obstetric fistula affect many of the nation’s women. HIV is also prevalent in the country. The other major health problem in Ethiopia is spread of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). AIDS has mainly affected poor communities and women, due to lack of health education, empowerment, awareness and lack of social well being.

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World’s Largest Burger

1 02 2011

A few months back I wrote a post listing what I deemed to be the 12 most disgusting foods in the World.

Well of course it is sod’s law that as soon as you commit anything like this to paper, or type as it is in this case, you suddenly come across a whole raft of other goodies that would easily have earnt themselves a place.

This is one of those contenders…

This humongous burger was cooked up by the owners of the Ambrosia on the Spot Cafe in Sydney, Australia.

The patty alone weighs in at an Earth shattering 178lb and took 12 hours to cook through. If  the meat alone wasn’t enough to induce a heart attack in 50 of your nearest and dearest friends the burger also contained 120 eggs, 150 slices of cheese, 1.5 kg of beetroot, 16 tomatoes, 2kg of lettuce and half a kilo of BBQ sauce…oh and 21kg of bread to make the giant buns.

The total weight of the burger once cooked – 95 kg!! That’s the same amount that I weigh, in fact it’s actually 1 kilo more than I weigh and I’m not a small guy.

The Guinness book of records have confirmed that this is indeed the World’s largest burger and that it has soundly smashed the previous holder which weighed in at a positively wimpy 84kg.

The owners of the cafe had to create special equipment to hold the burger during the marathon 12 hours that it took for it to cook through and it took four men in order to flip it over.

The burger was created solely to break the world record and to act as a publicity stunt however in order to meet the requirements laid down by Guinnes this monstrosity has to be on the menu at the cafe for at least a year.

Anyone wishing to tackle this mountain of meat will need to give at least 24 hours notice and will have to stump up a mighty A$1,500 (€1,100) for the pleasure.

Oh and they should probably have their affairs in order





Death Noobs

1 06 2010

I am noticing a little bit of a trend starting to emerge.

Anytime I am using the dungeon finder I am winding up in groups that are literally rammed full of Death Knights or as I have taken to thinking of them Death Noobs or maybe Knoobs, either way they still blow.

Now let me just start by stating that I don’t have an agenda against DKs as a class, I think the idea is actually quite appealing (I have a DK myself).

The problem comes from the fact that they can quite literally ruin a group if played poorly; I need to clarify on this:

A lot of new DK players assume that just because they wear plate and can tank that this is what they should be doing, it doesn’t matter if they have only ever played a mage or hunter or anything else for that matter there are a huge number of new DK players who think lets go tank.

This would be fine if they weren’t thrown into tanking instances such as Blood Furnace or Hellfire Ramparts. Whilst these aren’t difficult instances to tank (I am ret specced but have been able to tank both of these easily several times) they do require that you have some idea about what you are doing

I have been subject to far more deaths and wipes when it is a DK that is tanking than I have in all other dungeons and instances combined!

There are a number of common faults that I have noticed; pulling mobs when healers are mana burnt, grabbing large numbers of mobs and not holding them and of course my favourite: failnig to hold aggro and then blaming me and everyone else for having DPS that is too high.

Until this point I honestly hadn’t realised that it was possible for a DPS class to have too much DPS

It honestly seems like all of the fools who were previously giving hunters and rogues a bad name have migrated over to the DK class. I think one od the best examples I have seen was just yesterday evening, we were running Mana Tombs for what must be my 15th time now, there was a nice rare shield that dropped and the DK rolled need on it.

He won it and when asked why he rolled need on it he replied because he is a tank, normally an argument that holds a lot of water, but DKs CAN’T USE SHIELDS!?!?!

It would be exactly the same as if I rolled on a bow, wand, dagger etc it’s not even that they aren’t the best I just cannot use them and would look like a fool for rolling on them. I’m level 67 at the moment and by now it is expected (indeed I hold the same expectation) that you at least know the basics of how to play your class.
So please if you are a Death Knoob and happen to be reading this (assuming you can read!) then please please please learn how to play your class before chucking yourself into higher level content for which you aren’t ready. Look at it this way would you take a level 40 hunter that you had never played as before and think hey I know what would be the best thing for me to try first Zul Farrak…of course you wouldnt, but then again maybe you would!





mmmm meat candy not

17 05 2010

A co-worker of mine has been away in China for the past couple of weeks and came back to work yesterday.

We always bring back some sort of food stuff from trips and it has recently become an unofficial contest to see who can bring in the strangest thing.

I think we might have a winner or at least an incredibly strong front runner.

Chinese meat candies.

I like meat, I like candy and I like Chinese food so how bad can they be.

Well I will tell you exactly how bad they can be, it was a little bit like eating a sweaty sock full of garlic and chopped meat that had been crushed up into a tiny shite coloured cube mmmm delicious.

There was a spicy beef flavoured cube, a ginger pork flavoured cube and one which I actually believe to have been a lump of shrimp paste dusted in sugar and wrapped in fancy paper.

The pork and the beef were bad enough but the shrimp one was truly fishalicious, I was tasting that bad mother funker for about 3 hours afterwards.

If you ever find yourself with a pressing need to vomit you could do far worse then pop a few of these cubes of gastro-intestinal death.








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