The World’s End – Camden

9 05 2012

Here be Demons

I have never really understood why but an awful lot of people rave on and on and on about The World’s End as if it were the be all and end all of pubs.

Well it isn’t.

I honestly wonder if they are venturing through some portal into another dimension as in reality the WE is a tedious, boring, overly large tourist trap that plays annoying trendy music at pretty much any hour of the day or night.

However there is one distinction that I have to highlight. The World’s End is now the official recipient of my very own “Shittiest Beer Ever” award.

Three of us hung around this giant turd of a pub long enough to have 2 pints each as we had dinner reservations just round the corner and couldn’t be arsed to walk any further.

We each ordered a different pint and they were all absolute crud. Now I should take a moment to clarify here, we aren’t talking some rare amber nectar brewed by silent monks in the hinterlands of Nepal. No, we had Guinness, Old Speckled Hen and London Pride, not exactly the hardest beers to keep correctly.

The pints we received ran the whole gamut of foul… from an oily, dirty sheen on the ‘Hen to a slightly fishy taste and smell from the Guinness.

In summary: stay well away.

0.25/5

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The Coppermill – Walthamstow E17

1 10 2010

Address: 205, Coppermill Lane, London, E17 7HF

Tel: 08721 077 077

Stuck away at the bottom of Coppermill Lane by Walthamstow Marshes The Coppermill is a local pub in a way that very few pubs in London seem to be anymore.

Most of the people you will find drinking in here are locals  and the pub caters to their wants and needs; you won’t find Thai food rushing out of a kitchen or theme nights or a 2nd rate celebrity chef  on site but you will find a quiet pleasant pub which serves good beer that is well kept. A far cry by the standard of pubs in Walthamstow.

Whilst it is a little off the beaten track it is still close enough to the tube and overhead train stations to make it easy enough for a visitor to find (less than half a mile from Blackhorse road and St James street stations and about .8 of a mile from Walthamstow Central)

The pub is a  little on the small side and if you don’t manage to get a seat it can feel a little cramped; there is one single bar with seating around the outside of the room and there is now seating outside which is really nice on a summer’s evening.

The decor of the pub is a little overdone and if you didn’t realise from the get go that it’s a local pub you certainly will when you see that there are caricatures of regulars all over the place and that some people seem to have assigned seating…. All that aside I have never felt unwelcome in the Coppermill and the atmosphere is very pleasant; I also have it on good authority that they are more welcoming to gays and lesbians then most of the other pubs in the local area.

There is no really food offering here but that isn’t what this place is about,  if you are hungry mid-session there are the usual crisps and peanuts on offer along with some bar snacks more to my liking; pickled eggs, jellied eels and sometimes even some rollmops (pickled herrings rolled up with onion and gerkin) delicious!

When it comes to drinks all the usual culprits are available along with 4 handpumps, normally they have Greene King IPA, Fullers ESB and London Pride on the ramp and all are very well kept.  The 4th pump is for guest beers which rotate fairly frequently.

Most recently when I was in the Coppermill they had Thwaites Wainwright on as the guest beer which was no hardship, I have also had very good pints of Bombadier and Ringwoods Old Thumper out of there as well.

If you are looking for a nice day out I can think of a lot worse things to do then take a walk or cycle through to the marshes or the River Lea and popping into the Coppermill on the way.





Save our pubs!

29 04 2010

The pub has been a familiar part of the landscape of Britain for generations, whether it is a country pub in a rural village or a town centre establishment standing proudly on a corner. In recent years this landscape has been changing and not for the better. In 2006 the rate of pub closures stood at just 2 pubs per week, this is still over 100 pubs a year that were closing their doors but this figure pales into obscurity compared to the most recent results from 2009. As of 2009 there were 52 pubs shutting each week thats a massive 2,377 pubs that are closing in just one year, accounting for approximately 24,000 jobs. This is a simply staggering number and even if the trend were to be reversed we would never see the same number of pubs re-open. To give my own personal example of the sheer scale of pub closures across the country, I have to walk the best part of a mile to get to my nearest pub; this isn’t a case of being picky or choosing to visit this particular spot, it is simply the closest pub to where I live. Now you could be forgiven for thinking that maybe I live in some idyllic rural village and this is simply due to being in a remote location. Unfortunately you couldn’t be more wrong; I am talking about East London and on my way to the pub (The Coppermill) I have to pass 6 pubs that have closed in recent years. It isn’t so long ago that each of these pubs were thriving establishments, now one of them is being turned into flats and the others are just empty, slowly decaying away. During this same period of time the number of branded pubs and cafe-style bars have increased at a rate of 2 per week, it was also found that pubs that had a strong food offering were less likely to face closure. This is all very well and good but not every pub in the country can suddenly transform itself over night into a trendy gastro pub or city centre bar, it is jut not possible. So what has caused this huge upturn in the number of pubs that are calling last orders for the final time? Well there are a number of issues that are affecting Britain’s pubs today. The recession has caused a large downturn in the number of people that are visiting pubs and it is also affecting the average spend of drinkers, regardless of where the pub might be. The smoking ban has also driven people away from pubs, particularly when coupled with the ridiculously low prices and bargains that the large supermarket chains are offering on alcohol, why would you stand outside in the rain to smoke when you could drink cheaper beer at home and smoke inside if you so wished. The ever increasingly tax on beer has also played a part with the increases every year since 2000, bringing us to a point where the tax on a pint of beer costing an average price of £2.70 is now 70 pence. The bottom line is that pubs are closing and will continue to close unless something is done about it. So what is there that you can do to try to stop pub closures? CAMRA are running and supporting a number of campaigns targeted at slowing and reversing the trend of pub closure, you can sign up to support one such campaign “Back the Pub” here. You can also lobby your local MP to see what they are doing in relation to this, if you need contact details for your local MP you can find them here you simply need to enter your post code in order to get the details you need. But the easiest and most rewarding thing to do is visit your local pub, there is no better support then taking a stroll to the pub and enjoying a pint. I’m not saying not to pick up a bargain at the shops or enjoy a drink at home but remember your local as well, you’ll miss it when it is gone.





Who are CAMRA?

29 04 2010

You will probably hear me mention CAMRA a great deal in my posts, as such I should probably explain who they are and what they do.

In a nutshell CAMRA is the CAMpaign for Real Ale, they were formed back in the 70s with the aim of promoting and raising awareness for Real Ale, Real Cider and the British Pub.

They tend to promote smaller brewers and champion the less common types of beer and other traditional drinks; for example porters, milds, perry and stouts.

They publish a good beer guide each year, along with their monthly magazine which goes out to about 100k members.

CAMRA also organise and support a large number of beer festivals around the UK including the Great British Beer Festival at which there are often awards given out to beers that they deem to be particularly worthy.

If you want to find out more about them or possibly even become a member than you can visit there website here





Help stop pub closures

1 04 2010

As many of you will know I am a big fan of Real Beer and British pubs and that I run a blog dedicated to both.

What you might not be as aware of is that British pubs are shutting at an ungodly rate of 52 pubs a week, to find out more about the pub closures in the UK and to find out what you can do to help your local pub click here to read my full blog post.

I would encourage anyone with an interest in real beer and real pubs to subscribe to my blog for the best in news and reviews about all things beer related








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