Week 1 taste test

20 09 2010

My lager was bottled over a week ago now. It has spent this week liberally swaddled in coats and sweat shirts to ensure that it has stayed within it’s optimum temperature bracket of 21-24 degrees and it seems that I have succeeded 🙂

On getting home yesterday afternoon I decided to give it a quick taste test to see how things are faring one week on…. well the results are positive indeed.

The beer is reasonably fizzy (but not there yet) is keeping a decent head, has a reasonable amount of lacing on the glass and actually tastes good.

Not just like a half decent store bought lager but actually properly good!

Somehow by some miracle I was drinking lager that had a taste other then just being a really cold fizzy liquid 😀

Now to leave it be for another week at room temperature before sticking half of it into the fridge and the rest under the floorboards.

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Woodforde’s Admiral’s Reserve

9 08 2010

Before I chuck myself into my write up of this year’s GBBF (Great British Beer Festival) I thought I should really get round to publishing these reviews that have been kicking about on my notepad for a while now; so here is the first of them:

Admiral’s Reserve is a strong ale from the Woodforde’s brewery in Woodbastwick, Norfolk. Despite being a small brewery Woodforde’s have consistently produced exceptionally good beers and Admiral’s Reserve is no different.

When poured it has a tawny almost coppery colour with a very small, almost non-existent, fluffy head.

The aroma from the beer is fruity and sweet with a roasted malt undertone which stops it from being sickly or over powering.

Woodforde’s say that in both flavour and smell there are hints of sultanas, almond and sherry and they are bang on the money; however unlike a lot of beers with these particular flavours Admiral’s Reserve has none of the Christmas cake like overtones that you would expect.

The fruit is sweet but light, there are notes of caramel which add to the overall sweetness of the beer but there is also a rich roasted flavour that comes through from the malts (rye malt I believe) which balances things out nicely.

The mouthfeel of the beer is full bodied, malty and smooth with a nice bitter finish.

All in all a good beer and one that could be drunk often.

3.8/5





A Drop of Nelson’s Blood

5 05 2010

A Drop of Nelson’s Blood is one of a range of bitters from Farmers Ales (Maldon Brewing).

It was brewed for Trafalgar Day (21st October) and takes it name from Nelson’s body being returned to England preserved in a barrel of brandy. It is said that the sailors on the Victory drank some of the brandy as part of their grog ration, which became known as Nelson’s Blood. So a beer inspired by a national hero, a promising start!

Farmers Ales are based in Maldon in Essex and from what I gather they are very much a local brewer with local pubs featuring their beers on tap and a handful of restaurants and shops distributing bottled beer.

I had this particular beer in it’s bottle conditioned form at the restaurant of the Hyde Hall RHS garden a few miles down the road from the brewery.

In appearance it was a nice dark amber colour with no discernible sediment and very little by way of a head, the aroma is quite light and fruity with a slightly malty undertone but wasn’t particularly pungent.

In terms of taste I found Nelson’s Blood to be a little watery for my liking but it had quite a pleasant fruity,hoppy taste with a slight hintof caramel, there was also a fair strong nutty, woody taste that was coming through.

There is a slight hint of warmth to the beer which is possibly from the addition of the brandy.

All in all I found a Drop of Nelson’s Blood to be a not unpleasant beer from a good local brewer, it wouldn’t have me clamoring for more but at the same time I wouldn’t say no to a pint.

Overall I would give a score of 3.9/5








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